Permitted Development Rights: A Quick Guide - INNO Construction
A quick guide to your permitted development rights and planning permission including works on conservatories, single and two story extensions as well as loft conversions.
Permitted, Development, Home Improvement, Renovation, Extension
16711
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-16711,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-13.3,qode-theme-bridge,disabled_footer_top,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.0.5,vc_responsive
 

Permitted Development Rights: A Quick Guide

Permitted Development Rights: A Quick Guide

Permitted Development means certain types of work can be performed without a need for planning permission and whilst they are granted by parliament, meaning they apply nationally, there are still areas and reasons why local authority can override such rights. It is important to be certain, before undertaking any work, that you know exactly what does and does not require planning permission. This guide will give you a quick insight into the more general knowledge you’ll need and direct you towards the resources which provide more specific details for your particular project.

One of the most useful resources is the Interactive Planning Portal which will give you quick access to advice on any kind of work, in any kind of property, you might want to do. This is the best place to start as it will advise you on a national level about that which is considered under your Permitted Development Rights. Utilizing this tool alone, however, is not enough because you will find there are a number of other important factors relevant to your rights.

Firstly, you need to know whether your property falls into certain ‘designated areas’ where the permitted development rights are more restrictive. For instance, areas such as National Parks will have more restrictions and will require planning permission for work which other areas would not need. If you are unsure, the best thing to do is contact your local planning authority before you begin any work.

It is also possible that your Permitted Development Rights have been withdrawn by local planning authority and this would also mean you must request planning permission before undertaking any work. You are very likely to know if this affects you already but if you are again uncertain, you should contact your local planning authority.

Other Factors to Consider

Whilst the following factors usually only become relevant once you seek planning permission, it is worthwhile becoming familiar with some of them anyway. Even if the work falls under your Permitted Development Rights some aspects, such as how it might affect your neighbors, are important to consider:

Your Permitted Development Rights

All of this information is available via Planning Portal but we’ve condensed a lot of the most useful information for you below regarding some of the most popular projects which fall under Permitted Development. This information should not be used as a fully inclusive set of guidelines but as a first glance tool for learning roughly what you’ll be able to do. We recommend fully reading the appropriate documentation before committing to any work.

Permitted Development for Conservatory/Single Story Extensions

Both conservatories and single story extensions fall under the same Permitted Development rights which means you can extend without needing planning permissions provided your extension adheres to the following rules: (for properties on designated land, contact your local planning authority).

  • “No more than half the area of land around the “original house” would be covered by additions or other buildings. Sheds and other outbuildings must be included when calculating the 50 per cent limit”
  • “No extension forward of the principal elevation or side elevation fronting a highway.”
  • “Materials used in exterior work to be similar in appearance to those of the exterior of the existing house. This condition does not apply when the extension is a conservatory.”
  • “Side extensions to be single storey. Width of side extension must not have a width greater than half the width of the original house.”
  • “Side extensions to have a maximum height of 4m and width no more than half that of the original house.”
  • “If the extension is within 2m of a boundary, maximum eaves height should be no higher than 3m to be permitted development.”
  • “Single-storey rear extensions must not extend beyond the rear wall of the original house* by more than 4m if a detached house; or more than 3m for any other house.
    Where not on designated land* or a Site of Special Scientific Interest, this limit is increased to 8m if a detached house; or 6m for any other house.”
  • “Maximum height of a single-storey rear extension of 4m.”
  • “Maximum eaves and ridge height of extension no higher than existing house.”

Permitted Development for Two Story Extensions

  • “Extensions (including previous extensions) and other buildings must not exceed 50% of the total area of land around the original house. Sheds and other outbuildings must be included when calculating the above 50% limit.”
  • “Maximum eaves and ridge height of extension no higher than existing house.
    If extension is within two metres of a boundary maximum eaves height should be no higher than three metres to be permitted development.”
  • “Extensions of more than one storey must not extend beyond the rear wall of original house by more than three metres or be within seven metres of any boundary opposite the rear wall of the house.”
  • “Roof pitch of extensions higher than one storey to match that of the existing house, as far as is practicable.”
  • “Materials used in exterior work to be similar in appearance to those of the exterior of the existing house.”
  • “Any upper-floor window in a wall or roof slope in a side elevation must be obscure-glazed and non- opening unless the parts which can be opened are more than 1.7 metres above the floor of the room in which it is installed.”
  • “No balconies or verandas are permitted development”

Permitted Development for Loft Conversions

  • “To be permitted development any additional roof space created must not exceed 40 cubic metres for terraced houses and 50 cubic metres for detached and semi-detached houses.
    Any previous roof space additions must be included within this volume allowance. Although you may not have created additional space a previous owner may have done so.”
  • “An extension beyond the plane of the existing roof slope of the principal elevation that fronts a highway is NOT permitted development.”
  • “Materials to be similar in appearance to the existing house.”
  • “No part of the extension to be higher than the highest part of the existing roof.”
  • “Verandas, balconies or raised platforms are NOT permitted development.”
  • “Any side-facing windows must be obscure glazed and non-opening unless the parts which can be opened are more than 1.7 metres above the floor of the room in which it is installed.”
  • “Roof extensions, apart from hip to gable ones, to be set back, as far as is practicable, at least 20cm from the original eaves. The 20cm distance is measured along the roof plane.
    The roof enlargement cannot overhang the outer face of the wall of the original house.”
  • “Work on a loft or a roof may affect bats. You need to consider protected species when planning work of this type. A survey may be needed, and if bats are using the building, a licence may be required.”

Resources:

Planning Portal